Press Releases

B.C. Construction Workforce Set to Grow

January 18, 2016

British Columbia – Major new projects from LNG plants and pipelines to utilities and transportation work will bolster British Columbia’s construction workforce to new record highs in 2018 and 2019, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“A recruitment and training drive will be required this year and next,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “As many as 17,000 new workers will be needed by 2018 to meet rising labour demands.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows B.C. construction beginning the year in a growth phase with new infrastructure projects and energy development leading investment. Specialized trades will be in demand from 2016 to 2019. As projects wind down, labour market conditions will ease in 2020 and 2021 leaving a gain in new jobs by the end of the scenario period in 2025. Residential construction is expected to remain largely unchanged between now and 2018, before new housing activity declines as population growth slows, while demand for home renovation work rises.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast also shows:

  • Home renovation and maintenance work continue to grow, adding 2,000 jobs across the scenario.
  • Non-residential construction will be up by approximately 12,600 jobs at the end of the scenario in 2025.
  • There is a need to replace more than 39,500 baby boomers retiring from construction in the next 10 years.

“More than 22 percent of the province’s construction workforce is retiring this decade,” added Sparks. “It’s a huge loss of skills and experience that requires industry planning well in advance.”

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Canada’s Construction Industry Feels Impact Of Lower Commodity Prices

January 18, 2016

Ottawa – Construction will gain momentum in some regions while others feel the impact of lower commodity prices, delayed or cancelled projects and declining employment. As conditions unfold across the provinces, workforce mobility continues to play an important role in meeting industry’s regional labour requirements.

Mobility, along with an aging workforce are key themes according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“Shifting demographics and market conditions require a construction workforce with the flexibility to move with the times and the jobs,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “The reality is that in many provinces, the local workforce may not be enough to counter rising retirements and fill the jobs, especially when major projects gear up.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows that while the rate of construction job growth has slowed, most provinces will be recruiting for major projects, including electrical generation and transmission, commercial and industrial building, pipelines and LNG plants from now to 2019. Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador are the exception, with employment falling as current major projects are completed and proposed projects are delayed or cancelled. Overall conditions in Alberta are more complex where new investment declines, however, and there is evidence of potential recruiting challenges in other markets. Over the last decade there has been significant expansion in oil sands capacity and a growing commitment to maintenance and investments to sustain current production.

New home building is flat or declining in most provinces, with the exception of Quebec until 2017, and Ontario and Manitoba, where residential construction is expected to rise from now to 2018. While new housing slows across the scenario period, renovation work continues to rise across all provinces.

Across the 2016-2025 scenario, many of the 11,000 new jobs are in home renovation and industrial maintenance. Up to 250,000 construction workers, or 21 percent of the workforce, is set to retire in the next 10 years.

“Right across Canada, the biggest challenge is offsetting a rapidly aging construction workforce,” added Sparks. “With fewer skilled workers available to replace them, industry is facing a significant gap in skills and experience.”

Highlights of BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast can be found for each province at www.constructionforecasts.ca.

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce.

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Construction Industry Needs to Focus on Replacing Rapidly Aging Workforce

January 18, 2016

Nova Scotia – Growth in home renovation, non-residential construction and the need to replace a rapidly aging workforce are creating new job opportunities for skilled workers in Nova Scotia, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“Total employment levels are expected to remain relatively unchanged,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “But new job opportunities are emerging more in non-residential maintenance and residential renovation work.

BuildForce Canada’s 2016–2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows moderate job growth spread across non-residential building construction and civil construction such as new distribution lines and wind projects. New job opportunities are also being created in home renovation and non-residential maintenance work. Renovation activity rises to help sustain the older housing stock as employment in new housing falls.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast shows:

  • Employment in non-residential building and engineering projects is expected to rise modestly by 1,200 jobs or 8 percent over the next 10 years.
  • Residential employment declines by 2,200 jobs as the demand for new housing slows and is only partially offset by growth in renovation work.

“The retirement of 8,500 skilled workers creates the recruitment challenge this decade,” added Sparks. “Replacing 24 percent of the workforce over the next 10 years is even more difficult when the pool of young job seekers is shrinking.”

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Construction Workforce Challenges Take On New Focus

January 18, 2016

Alberta – Oil sands job losses, an aging workforce, the departure of out-of-province workers and the ongoing demand for workers to sustain and maintain projects are all behind complex shifts in Alberta’s construction workforce, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“A skills vacuum is a real risk with the exodus of thousands of interprovincial workers within and outside the resource industry,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “The loss of as many as 36,000 skilled workers retiring this decade makes it even more challenging to replace that kind of experience.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows that declining oil prices are driving employment lower across all construction sectors, with the projected loss of 31,000 jobs from the peak in 2014 to 2019.

Even as Alberta’s economy weakens, however, there is work in sustaining capital, maintenance, shutdowns/turnarounds and outages for skilled trades such as boilermakers, pipefitters and specialty welders. BuildForce Canada’s annual forecast also shows:

Oil sands construction:

  • Labour requirements decline by 28 percent from the peak in 2014 to 2020. A gradual increase in oil prices restores confidence with new investment in the oil sands in 2020.
  • Employment follows, with gains of 4,000 jobs from 2020 to 2025, primarily in sustaining capital and maintenance.

Non-residential construction:

  • Investment and employment mirror the oil sands cycle with job losses that total 16,500 by 2019 compared to the 2014 peak. As markets improve after 2020, employment rises by 12,000 by the end of the scenario period in 2025. Low oil prices that prompted a decline in engineering, institutional and industrial construction in 2015 carry through to 2019.
  • Commercial building is the exception, with current project activity continuing into 2016, before slowing in 2017, and growing in steady increments over the long term.

Residential construction:

  • Total residential construction falls by 9,000 jobs from 2016 to 2019, followed by a partial recovery that raises employment by 7,000 jobs to 2025.
  • Home renovation work is stable, growing by 1,900 jobs across the forecast period.

“Alberta has been through construction cycles before, but nothing this complex,” added Sparks. “That’s why it’s crucial for industry to stay focused on recruiting young people and attracting and keeping those skilled trades that are, or will be in the most demand.”

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Construction Workforce Feels Impact of Lower Oil Prices

January 18, 2016

Newfoundland and Labrador – Local construction employers in Newfoundland and Labrador are downsizing their workforces as major resource projects reach completion and others are delayed or cancelled, according to the latest labour market forecast released today from BuildForce Canada.

“The challenge is making sure enough skilled workers are available when projects are ready to move forward,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “Shifting project timelines have become the new norm for construction.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows labour requirements declining as large power and offshore oil development projects wind down between now and 2018. New offshore oil projects are expected to resume in 2020. Job losses in housing, commercial and institutional building construction from now to 2019 will be followed by renewed, but moderate growth, with hiring for renovation, maintenance, commercial and institutional building projects toward the end of the scenario period.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast also shows:

  • a small decline in residential employment through 2019 before levelling off across the scenario period
  • the need to offset rising retirements as 6,300 baby boomers leave the industry over the next 10 years

“Construction employers must stay focused on recruiting, hiring and training as labour requirements and demographics shift, ” added Sparks. “With up to 24 percent of the workforce retiring this decade, that’s a lot of experience that isn’t easily replaced.”

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program
 

Manitoba’s Construction Workforce To Hit New Record High

January 18, 2016

Manitoba – Manitoba’s construction sector still has momentum, as major new hydro, transmission and pipeline projects drive construction employment to a new record high in 2018, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“The local construction industry is benefiting from Manitoba’s more diverse economy,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “From power line work to homebuilding and renovation, there are opportunities for skilled tradespeople in construction.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows major projects boost employment over the next two years, stretching Manitoba’s 10-year construction expansion to peak activity levels in 2018. A gradual rise in commercial and industrial building construction and growing demand for maintenance work also create new jobs in almost every year of the scenario. Up to 2,600 new jobs are added over the next 10 years, sustaining moderate employment growth in non-residential construction.  

BuildForce Canada’s forecast also shows:

  • Between now and 2018, modest growth in new housing construction creates as many as 1,500 new jobs before slowing in 2020. Home renovation and maintenance work add 900 jobs across the scenario period.  
  • Cyclical changes in construction employment may require workers willing to move from other provinces, sectors and industries.
  • As many as 8,200 skilled workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers over the next 10 years.

“With more than 20 percent of the construction workforce retiring this decade, employers can’t afford to ease up on recruitment,” added Sparks. “Hiring more young people remains an industry priority.”  

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Ontario’s Construction Workforce Becoming Harder to Build

January 18, 2016
Rising Retirements Create Recruitment Challenges

Ontario – New housing and major infrastructure projects will drive Ontario’s construction job growth to 2019, putting the industry under pressure to build the workforce as retirements rise and the pool of applicants gets smaller, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“As population growth slows and a smaller pool of youth enters the workforce, adding new workers may become progressively more difficult,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “With more than 21 percent of the workforce retiring in the next 10 years, it’s a race against the clock to offset the loss of that much experience.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows the strongest job growth from 2016 to 2019, with new job opportunities spread across most markets and regions. Construction employment peaks in 2019, marking a 25-year expansion that has doubled the size of the workforce. Opportunities shift across the province between big infrastructure projects, industrial work, commercial building activity and a rising cycle in new housing from 2016 to 2018.

“Job growth is the strongest in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and Southwestern Ontario,” added Sparks. “From now to 2019, specialized trades are in demand as new housing, infrastructure and major engineering projects ramp up.”

Forecast highlights include the following:

  • Rising retirements will create the need to replace more than 85,000 new workers over the next decade.
  • New housing job opportunities shift across the scenario period with the addition of 22,000 jobs from 2016 to 2019, followed by job losses. The growth in renovation work creates 2,000 jobs across the period.
  • Non-residential construction rises fairly consistently, while major engineering and civil projects create short-term hiring fluctuations. Employment grows by 7,600 workers across the period.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast, by region:

Greater Toronto Area (GTA)

  • Hiring will focus on specialized trades for some of Ontario’s largest and ongoing engineering projects in transit and nuclear refurbishment. Commercial construction, home renovation and maintenance are steady employment growth areas.

Central Ontario

  • High levels of employment are sustained with cyclical job gains and losses less pronounced than in other regions.

Eastern Ontario

  • Over the past few years, Eastern Ontario construction markets have lagged behind other regions.  A limited number of institutional and engineering projects boost employment early in the scenario period.  As projects end and government restraint continues, however, employment recedes back to current 2015 levels.

Northern Ontario

  • Employment is expected to rise as major gold mine and potential new resource developments start, and then end after 2019 and 2020. Renewed growth raises residential investment, housing starts and employment, however much depends on the timing of proposed resource development projects which could be hampered by weak commodity prices and global demands

Southwest Ontario

  • Employment recovers with a revival in housing starts, major bridge construction, nuclear power plant refurbishment and other utilities work. There are modest employment gains in industrial activity.

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Opportunities for Young People to Start Construction Career

January 18, 2016

Prince Edward Island – Major projects, an upswing in residential building and rising retirements are creating opportunities for young job seekers in P.E.I.’s construction industry, according to the latest labour market forecast from BuildForce Canada.

“With more than 27 percent of the construction workforce retiring this decade, retirees are outnumbering new recruits,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “It’s a demographic shift that opens the door for young people considering a career in construction.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows commercial and institutional building projects are driving most of the province’s construction job growth. Highways, bridgework and other major engineering projects will also help boost non-residential construction employment to new high levels in 2017 and again in 2020. A resurgence in new housing activity, along with steady growth in home renovation, will create jobs in residential construction between now and 2021. P.E.I.’s construction workforce will grow by 600 workers, or 10 percent over the scenario period.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast also shows:

  • When planned major projects wind down after 2020, rising retirements and steady maintenance work provide stable conditions for non-residential construction workers.
  • As many as 1,700 skilled workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers over the next 10 years.

“The construction industry is relying on young people as well as experienced workers willing to make the move from other sectors and provinces,” added Sparks. “Their skills are needed, especially when construction activity peaks.”

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

Planned Projects To Create New Construction Jobs

January 18, 2016
Industry Works to Counter Baby Boomer Exodus

New Brunswick – Proposed resource projects are expected to raise construction employment in New Brunswick higher from 2017 to 2019 while rising retirements add to long-term market challenges, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“The retirement rate in New Brunswick’s construction industry far exceeds the national average at more than 27 percent,” said Rosemary Sparks Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “Replacing as many as 8,000 baby boomers this decade puts a lot of pressure on industry to make up for such a significant loss of skills and experience.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows proposed pipeline, marine terminal and resource projects are driving job growth from 2017 to 2019, but much depends on the timing of major projects. Most of the non-residential construction hiring will take place next year, as the workforce returns to the record high level of 2011. Labour requirements in non-residential construction shift after 2020, when planned major projects wind down. Job losses will be partly offset by moderate growth in commercial and institutional building construction, a proposed hydro dam refurbishment project and growing demand in maintenance work. At the end of the scenario period, the construction workforce is expected to have grown by more than 1,800 workers.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast also shows:

  • Industrial, commercial and institutional (ICI) building activity is projected to rise across the scenario period, adding 600 jobs.
  • Maintenance-related employment shows steady, moderate growth, adding 500 jobs from now to 2025.
  • Moderate growth in residential building activity that starts in 2017 restores some jobs lost during a decline in housing activity from 2011 to 2016. While home renovation work rises modestly, total residential employment remains relatively unchanged by the end of the scenario period.

“Rising retirements and a smaller pool of young people to draw from may create recruiting challenges across the outlook period,” added Sparks. “Companies may need to rely on labour mobility of skilled trades from other sectors or provinces to help meet demand.”

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program
 

Proposed Resource Projects Sustain Non-Residential Construction

January 18, 2016

Saskatchewan – This year marks the start of a new, but more moderate growth phase in non-residential construction in Saskatchewan, with employment driven by major mining and infrastructure projects, as well as steady gains in maintenance work in the near term, according to the latest labour market forecast released today by BuildForce Canada.

“While resource development is slowing, there is still momentum,” said Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of BuildForce Canada. “We’re seeing two very distinct trends, with residential building declining and non-residential building sustained at high levels, although much depends on the timing of proposed major projects.”

BuildForce Canada’s 2016‒2025 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward forecast shows that after stalling last year, non-residential construction will expand from 2016 to 2021, creating 4,000 jobs. As projects wind down after 2021, engineering-related work declines, with job losses offset by moderate growth in industrial, commercial and institutional (ICI) building construction. The housing downturn is expected to continue, with the residential workforce dropping back to the pre-2011 level of 13,000 workers. Overall, employment declines by 3,100 jobs, or 7 percent, by the end of the scenario period in 2025, driven primarily by the decline in new housing.

BuildForce Canada’s forecast also shows:

  • From 2016 to 2025, employment in non-residential construction is relatively unchanged, with a small gain of 400 non-residential jobs.
  • As new housing slows, residential construction employment declines by 3,500 workers over the scenario period.
  • Almost 18 percent of the construction workforce is expected to retire over the next 10 years.

“Saskatchewan’s construction workforce is experiencing a demographic shift,” added Sparks. “The industry will need to recruit young people to replace as many as 8,800 skilled workers reaching retirement this decade."

BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization that represents all sectors of Canada’s construction industry. Its mandate is to provide accurate and timely labour market data and analysis, as well as programs and initiatives to help manage workforce requirements and build the capacity and the capability of Canada’s construction and maintenance workforce. Visit: www.constructionforecasts.ca

For further information, contact: Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director, BuildForce Canada, sparks@buildforce.ca or (905)-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sectoral Initiatives Program

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